Garden of life organic plant based protein bars



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Garden of life organic plant based protein bars from Australia's own organic growers. With an amazing range of fruit, nut and seed based protein bars. All our bars are organic, gluten free, vegan and dairy free. We love to use fresh organic fruit and nuts, which means the bars taste great and are made from healthy and delicious ingredients. If you’re in Sydney then drop in to store on High St Darlinghurst, on High St Paddington, or online shop at http://goo.gl/xXa3jy

Garden of life organic plant based protein bars from Australia's own organic growers. With an amazing range of fruit, nut and seed based protein bars. All our bars are organic, gluten free, vegan and dairy free. We love to use fresh organic fruit and nuts, which means the bars taste great and are made from healthy and delicious ingredients. If you’re in Sydney then drop in to store on High St Darlinghurst, on High St Paddington, or online shop at http://goo.gl/xXa3jy

published:12 Feb 2014

views:292350

It's no secret that organic food has become more mainstream in recent years. Today, there are many ways for consumers to find and purchase foods that are certified organic. To take one example, the United States Department of Agriculture reported in 2015 that roughly 31 percent of American supermarkets sell some form of organic food. That translates to some 40 million food items.

As such, it’s also no secret that the organic food market is dominated by a few large players, like General Mills’ Organic &, Natural Brands division, Mondelez International’s Milorganite and Sara Lee’s Goodlife Foods.

Those companies – and the multitude of similar businesses across the United States – have gained this dominant position because of the high-profit margins associated with the organic industry.According to one study, which examined the top retailers’ top selling commodities, margins for organics were approximately 500 percent higher than those of conventional products. Meanwhile, other research has suggested that, on average, organic agriculture industries around the world generate net margins of more than 30 percent.

So what does the market look like today? Or, to be more precise, what does the grocery industry look like?

According to some industry experts, much of the top of the market is already owned by large, national chains and industrial food firms. Specifically, the Organic Trade Association reported that, as of the end of 2016, there were some 3,650 organic food and beverage companies across the United States. And some 500 of those were owned by firms that also manufacture conventional products.

Those 500 companies – which, of course, include some household names – include giants like ConAgra, General Mills, Kraft and Kroger. While those conglomerates may not have as broad a range of conventional foods as they once did, they do have significant organic holdings, which give them a strong competitive edge.

In other words, there are no “new” organic markets. Instead, according to some industry observers, the “future” of the industry will look a lot like what we’ve seen for the past decade: organic food and beverage companies making significant profits in a fragmented market.

In some ways, that fragmentation actually reflects the organic market’s strength. After all, there’s plenty of good business in building a national brand – and that’s exactly what these national players have done, spending billions of dollars and growing market share in an unprecedented fashion. And as with any good brand, once you build it, it’s not just about winning new consumers – it’s about protecting and enhancing your existing loyal consumers.

And as the “national” companies become more entrenched, it will be critical for other companies to take their place and be the “face” of organic and local – and do it in a way that makes them look good. Simply put, consumers don’t like buying from companies they don’t know. And if that brand is owned by a large, well-known industrial firm, it’s not likely to gain much traction.

As such, I’m starting to see more and more organic and local players emerge in the face of these larger, more established firms. Specifically, I’ve noticed that there’s been a notable increase in local, natural foods retailers and restaurants in particular – and it’s really good news. Local, organic and natural food providers are becoming more sophisticated and can give the national players a run for their money. But, at the end of the day, it’s more about building brand than about product, and it’s about building the right brand for the right consumer.

I’m seeing so much potential in this new wave of local food and beverage companies that I’ve been asking myself whether these new players would be a good fit for my own business. And I have to say – yes, I do think so.

Let me be clear: I don’t think that any one local, organic or natural food/beverage provider can provide consumers with all the goods and services they want – but as I’ve noted previously, if you can choose from five or ten or 20 local companies, that’s a pretty powerful tool. And the fact that these types of companies are starting to grow and become more sophisticated means that they’re providing a more effective level of choice than the national, traditional, big brand outfits.

What’s more, I’ve noticed that these smaller, local food/beverage providers tend to be a bit more entrepreneurial than the large retailers. That means that they’re able to respond quickly to new trends and emerging consumer demands.In other words, they’re more likely to be in tune with what consumers are looking for than large, “monolithic” food and beverage companies. They’re also more agile and nimble than large national companies that have to balance numerous product lines, markets and competitors. And, as I’ve previously noted, I think these small, entrepreneurial types of companies are the ones that are most likely to succeed in the long term.

So that’s why I think local, organic, natural and craft is such a valuable tool in the grocery shopping process.

]]>,https://www.foodservicecanada.com/2014/05/20/local-organic-natural-and-craft-all-the-ways-to-add-diversity-to-the-grocery-shopping-experience/feed/0The Power of Being Local: An Interview with Andrew Smithhttps://www.foodservicecanada.com/2014/04/26/the-power-of-being-local-an-interview-with-andrew-smith/

https://www.foodservicecanada.com/2014/04/26/the-power-of-being-local-an-interview-with-andrew-smith/#commentsTue, 26 Apr 2014 10:38:26 +0000http://www.foodservicecanada.com


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