Marisela prayer plant care



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Marisela prayer plant care.

I don’t know where the prayer plant came from.

My mother gave it to me after my brother died. He didn’t even live long enough to be cremated and it’s been in my family for at least two generations.

Growing Prayer plants are fairly simple and straightforward.

Growing a Prayer Plant is as simple as:

1. Find a cool place (outdoors, if possible) in your home

2. Find a dark place

3. Put the Mother plant in a cool, dry place. It should be in a dark place, but it is also fine to put a shaded area of your home in the dark.

4. Allow mother to grow slowly (at least a foot per week).

5. Wait.

If you want a larger plant, you can split mother plants. It is possible to harvest the first plant and allow the second to grow. To do this, cut the plant in half vertically (so that each plant becomes two separate plants), with one section remaining healthy and able to continue to grow. The plant will continue to grow, but in the center of the root structure, there will be a new root. If you harvest early enough, that new plant will be able to continue to grow without a new mother plant.

There are a lot of books on prayer plants available, but I like this one the best.

It’s written by an anthropologist and she’s spent a lot of time in South America. She talks about the importance of prayer plants, and describes the rituals and stories of the people she’s met. She explains a little about growing prayer plants.

I am fascinated by prayer plants.

I want to grow more, in my yard, in my home.

In other words, I want to be like a plant and grow bigger and bigger, with a new prayer growing in the center of my heart.

A few weeks ago I met two women.

One was a nurse who works at the local hospital. The other was the mother of a six year old boy. They were at the local church doing a community service for one of the moms who was dealing with the death of her child.

They were all talking about this boy who had passed away in a nearby town. They were all really sad, and the mom started to cry.

Then one of the nurses spoke up.

She said:

That boy loved to draw.

Every time he drew he would take his art supplies out onto the porch, where the mom could see him.

That’s where he would sit, and draw, while she was inside, working or taking a nap.

This was a really nice, touching story.

The kid loved to draw.

And he drew, just as he loved to eat, so his mom knew what to get for him, each time she got home from work.

As the mom was driving home from the service, she looked in the rear view mirror, and saw that the kid was drawing.

He was drawing while she was driving.

It made her want to draw, too.

It made her happy to be driving while he drew.

It was a little thing, maybe, but that little bit of happiness made all the difference, as she drove home.

The nurse who told the story was a nurse who has been with this mom for over ten years.

She knows this mom, her son, and this story.

The mom cried, and then she told the nurse that her son loved to draw.

This is where the story changes.

“He had no idea how to draw.”

She explained to the nurse that he loved to draw, but that he had no idea what he was doing.

“He has no talent.”

The nurse explained to the mom that she thought, sometimes, that her son did have talent, but he wasn’t showing that talent to anyone.

And that was okay, because that would come out, when he was ready to show his art, and when he was ready, it would be very obvious that he had talent.

“I don’t want to put any pressure on him.”

The nurse explained to the mom that she understood, that she was just trying to help.

She thought that it was good, that the kid wanted to draw.

The nurse went on to explain to the mom, that she herself loved to draw, and that it was important that her son loved to draw, too.

The nurse explained to the mom that her son’s drawings were pretty cute.

“If he gets into art, we can turn it into a hobby.”

The mom thought about that.

“Let’s make it an art class.”

Then the mom told the nurse that she wanted to enroll her son in an art class.

“An art class?”

The mom nodded.

“Yeah, that’s what we call it. An art class.”

So the mom and the nurse agreed that the class would start in a month or two.

“He could take the rest of the year off, then, from school, and he’d start in September.”

The mom agreed, and the nurse said that she’d have her secretary set it up.

“Great,” the mom said.

She gave the nurse a hug.

“Thank you.”

“Any time,” the nurse replied, and went back to the kids’ area.

A few days later, the mom got a call from the teacher, who set up a time for her son to come by and see the teacher’s office.

“The secretary will bring him by on Monday morning,” the teacher said. “The secretary will make the arrangements, too.”

The mom wondered what was going on.

“What is all this?”

“You’ll see.”

“All right.”

When the mom got home, the baby was sleeping.

Her husband was reading the newspaper.

“We got a call about an art class for the baby,” she told him.

“That’s great,” the husband said, and went back to his newspaper.

When the mom walked into the living room, she was greeted with a note from the teacher.

“The nurse said your son was very cute and they really liked him.”

“That’s wonderful.”

The note continued, “He just showed up, so she didn’t have time to talk to him about the class.”

The mom began to wonder what was going on.

“The teacher said the nurse made the arrangements and he just showed up.”

“What are we going to do with him?”

“I don’t know. I don’t see how we can turn him down. It’s a real opportunity for him.”

The mom picked up the note.

“Well, what’s his name?”



Comments:

  1. Dar-Al-Baida

    beautiful))

  2. Jut

    Funny situation

  3. Vudogor

    my dad has a lot of joy! )))

  4. Vijas

    Earlier I thought differently, I thank for the help in this question.

  5. Mukonry

    It is well said.

  6. Franz

    Granted, a great message



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